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george  
#1 Posted : 16 January 2010 15:42:19(UTC)
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Hello everybody

Now the snow is going I thought a new topic might be in order, I introduce this with your dad in mind Gnats I am sure it will bring back some memories. John Warren's diaries give some fascinating insights into the beginnings and early years of Goyt Mill, much more interesting than I would. I will try and attach some photos. 

File Attachment(s):
Bridge St. Showing Goyt Mill chimney 001.jpg (516kb) downloaded 402 time(s).
Bridge St. Showing Goyt Mill chimney 001.jpg (516kb) downloaded 236 time(s).
Bridge St showing.side of Goyt Mill.JPG (579kb) downloaded 294 time(s).
More of Goyt Mill from the bridge.jpg (415kb) downloaded 296 time(s).
Front view of Goyt mill.jpg (410kb) downloaded 315 time(s).
Looking at the far end from Bingswood land.jpg (801kb) downloaded 263 time(s).
G. Jackson  
#2 Posted : 16 January 2010 17:55:53(UTC)
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Dear George,

                        What wonderful photos and what memories they brought back. My mother and grand mother both worked there and I used to go in there as a child after school. The noise was breathtakingly loud. I can remember mum used to talk without speaking similarly to Les Dawson did in his sketches years later. All the ladies there had to learn to lip read. Mum started out as a weaver but later became someone who used to get rid of faults in the cloth by combing the fault with a very fine stainless steel comb. Her job was called a scratter-upper I seem to recall. The talk at home after work was always about some woman or other that had caused a flaw in the cloth that they were weaving and it had gone too far for the scratter-upper to help as it had "gone over the sand roller" Elliott Hurst was in charge later on I recall. He lived on Whaley Lane.

Fedup  
#3 Posted : 16 January 2010 19:29:56(UTC)
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Wonderful photos George.

Even I, as a relative newcomer to Whaley, remember the old Mill building.

Edited by user 16 January 2010 19:30:28(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

R. Stephenson-Smythe  
#4 Posted : 16 January 2010 20:34:15(UTC)
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Yes George,
 
As Jackson says: “fine photos indeed” and another great historical topic started by yourself once again.
 
With your permission I shall reproduce your photos so that there is no need to open them and they will just appear, as if by magic, on the same page that we are now reading. I might even have a few photos of my own of the Mill but I have not got one of that place within those boundaries that frightened us so much.
 
Sleep well George you are an absolute credit to this forum, please continue with all your photos and valuable information. It must not get lost.
 
R. S-S
 
Gnatalee  
#5 Posted : 16 January 2010 20:40:07(UTC)
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Thank you George !! 

You've excelled yourself.       I've had a chat with Dad tonight about your posting on Goyt Mill. He worked there at the age of 14 and recalls Elliott Hurst, who G.Jackson refers to. He thinks of them as happy days, and says that later on he moved on to work at the "Wire Mill" (I think he probably moved for better money) where he remained until he moved on to "pastures new" at the age of 17. I think his sister may have also gone on to work at Goyt Mill - and living in Bridge Street it would have been a hop and a step to work !! In later years she lived in George Street and later moved to Macc Road.

George, it is so nice for me to be able to talk things "old Whaley" to him - he is the last member of his "immediate" family (although he still has cousins) and so a chance for him to chat about anything "Whaley" is always welcome.

Keep posting !

Best wishes

Gnats

Edited by user 16 January 2010 20:42:17(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

parabuild  
#6 Posted : 17 January 2010 08:36:01(UTC)
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The "Picture The Past" website seems to have been updated and now includes photos from Derek Brumhead's collection.  These include some pictures of Goyt Mill as well as the Transhipment shed and incline.

george  
#7 Posted : 17 January 2010 15:12:36(UTC)
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Hello all

I am glad your dad enjoyed the photos Gnats I thought the one going round the back of the mill would bring back memories most kids in the vicinity would wonder all around behind the mill and round to the council yard. The photo was taken with George St. off to the left and opposite you would see spring water coming down through wood and over the wall on the right.   I am happy for anyone to play around with any photos I post so feel free R S-S.

george

R. Stephenson-Smythe  
#8 Posted : 17 January 2010 16:24:22(UTC)
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Memories, George?
 
Yes memories indeed and very eerie ones to boot.
 
R, S-S
R. Stephenson-Smythe  
#9 Posted : 19 January 2010 18:08:03(UTC)
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Hi George,
 
Thank you for your permission to reproduce your fine photos so they are easier to view.
I haven’t had time just yet but will get to it shortly.
 
In the meantime I will put one of my own on here at the end of this post.
 
The first foundations were dug on 7th August, 1865.
 
So I suppose the factory had a pretty good run all things considered.
 
Weaving started on 12th February 1866 so they didn’t mess about with building the place.
 
From John Warren’s Diary:
 
15 Mar 1869           Mr Robert Ashworth became manager.
 
27 May 1869           A strike at the weaving shed on account of 5 per cent being taken off.
 
19 May 1870           The weavers at Goyt Mill burned the effigy of the manager, Mr Ashworth, at Bingswood cottages.
 
31 Jul 1871             Mr Robert Ashworth, the late manager at Goyt Mills, removed his furniture from Whaley Bridge.
 
Now then the above may be of interest to certain people on another thread on the other side of the forum (Yes you Fedup):
 
Burning effigies can get rid of people in authority and I am definitely not going to mention any single person on the Council or even all of them.
 
I didn’t even know they burnt effigies in 1870 perhaps we should revive that custom today.
 
Right let’s forget that then and carry on.
 
Business was bad and the factory had to close its doors on 16th April, 1872.
 
Again from John Warren’s Diary:
 
18 Jun 1872            Damage of the Goyt Mill caused by a severe flood.
 
 
Press Report:
 
revival of trade.    We have been informed on good authority that the weaving sheds at the Goyt Mills, Whaley Bridge, are to resume work in the first week of the new year.    It is stated that the works will be carried on by the owners of the property, Messrs Dilworth & Son.    If the report proves correct some good will be done for the trade of the locality.
 
Now is it just me or does that sound a bit like an insurance scam?
 
 
Photo of Goyt Mill:
 
 
 
 
 
 
Still very scary memories for me the back of that place.
 
R. S-S
Fedup  
#10 Posted : 19 January 2010 18:46:32(UTC)
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My word R.S-S. You do delight in putting evil thoughts into my head!

Why scary memories - what dreadful deeds went on there?

Edited by user 19 January 2010 18:48:47(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

High Peak Harry  
#11 Posted : 19 January 2010 19:05:54(UTC)
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I can remember working in that yard on the day of the Royal wedding. Charles and Diana that is, not Victoria and Albert like R.S-S or G.Jackson may remember!

On the corner of that picture is where the canteen was and I can remember working on Saturday mornings and the landlord from the Goyt used to come down with a load of bacon and egg rolls. I seem to remember he had a pair of bizarre furry boots which looked like he'd cut a pair of Yeti's feet off. Still, it's got to be better than a horse with silver shoes hasn't it?
frjamie@talktalk.net  
#12 Posted : 19 January 2010 22:22:51(UTC)
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Dear R S S,

Good evening to you all, and hope you are all well.

I have today been at Hospital and just got back having passed 3 gritting lorries in Disley,   ( Who said we had no Gritt ).

Anyway a very good picture as usual, and thinking in my head for all you -                "Whaleyens"  out their.

 Am I right in thinking that when the mill was first built  around 8 months later it went up for auction in Manchester at the Midland Hotel.

I know that  here at the Hall their was bits and bobs around at one time about the ownership of the mills, and indeed the leases etc.

A lot of info was kept in Manchester at Calico, but  I was told that  it was not kept in order.

One does wonder what happenned to it all, I suppose it has been lost.

Anyway R S S look forward as usual to your reply and if your their George  do you  know anything ?

Enjoy the rest of your evening

 

Fr Jamie

Whaley Hall

 

R. Stephenson-Smythe  
#13 Posted : 20 January 2010 17:36:45(UTC)
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Hello Jamie,
 
I have not heard that the Mill was sold at auction 8 months after it was built but that is not to say that it wasn’t.
 
The weaving shed (always known locally as ‘The Shed’) was built for Mr Adshead who moved to Whaley to live at Horwich Bank.
 
Weaving started on 12th February 1866 under the ownership of Mr Addshead.
By 1872 the Shed was owned by Dilworth’s so I don’t know when, why or under what circumstances it changed hands.
 
In 1899 there were plans to increase the size of the place to house 1,000 looms and to have the new electric lights installed for the workers.
 
In 1914 there was another extension on a triangular piece of land that adjoined the factory that had been vacant for some 50 years and half a dozen cottages were also demolished to make more room.
 
Tell you what Jamie; did you ever go in The Shed? What a noise most of the workers were accomplished lip readers.
I went down a few times to see my Grandma who worked there and as I say; what a noise. It wouldn’t be allowed today.
 
R. S-S
 
 
 
G. Jackson  
#14 Posted : 20 January 2010 20:16:10(UTC)
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As I said in an earlier post on this topic the noise was tremendous in "The Shed". If anyone wants to know how bad it was they could visit  Queens Mill in Burnley. It is the last steam driven weaving mill in the UK. I went recently and it certainly was worth the visit.  For info on this type Queens Mill Burnley into Google.

G.J.

Edited by user 20 January 2010 20:19:08(UTC)  | Reason: spelling mistake

frjamie@talktalk.net  
#15 Posted : 20 January 2010 20:47:48(UTC)
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Dear R S S,

Many thanks for your email,

I had never had the chance to go into the mill,  and in many ways feel that I had missed  out.

I am sure it was around 8 months, and when it went for Auction in Manchester nobody wanted it the first time round.

I think their is something about it in John Warrens diary's 1 + 2.

I remember when I was younger being told about  mill workers being able to lip read,  and as a 12 year old,  having a Saturday job in a corn mill this was rather noisy with all the machinery going, all the belts lapping around and the shuddering of the mill.

However under the 1963 Factory Act  mill machinery  was stopped on all floors, and had to convert to electricity.

Such acts sadly caused some mills to smash up their historic machinery. 

In the case of Sandbach Mill in Cheshire, for which I had my book published  when I was  -      12 the mill stones and water wheel was smashed up and put in the culvert.

The water wheel was overshot 10x 60 driving through conventional gearing.

Also for those of us who like steam engines their was a beam engine with a 8" diameter fly wheel.

Such great machines now gone, once built in places like Fodens,  in  Sandbach.

I do feel at times that we have gone backwards, and are told these days that such things can not be made in this country due to not having the tradesmen !!!!!!!

Anyway R S S the snow has gone, and next week  if you want to come over to the Hall give me a call and come and have a coffee.

Many thanks

 

Jamie

 

Fr Jamie

Whaley Hall

R. Stephenson-Smythe  
#16 Posted : 08 February 2010 15:36:52(UTC)
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A very good afternoon to you George,
 
Well it is a very cold day today with flickers of snow off and on.
 
I have been doing a job outside today myself and I got very cold indeed; not so for the men stoking the boilers at Goyt Mill all those years ago.
 
Personally I don’t know which was worse: working with the looms or stoking the boilers. I think a vote would provide a close call.
 
R. S-S
 
I’ve not forgot you Jamie by the way.

 

 

shallcross  
#17 Posted : 23 September 2010 23:40:37(UTC)
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I thought  I would be better posting on this thread rather than the Fish & Chip thread Goyt Mill workers  Winding Dept

don't know them all maybe someone else can fill the gaps not the best quality photo I am afraid.

L - R

Back Row  - Elizabeth Shaw (nee Depledge),  ? Finnigan, Polly Shirt (nee Depledge), 

Lucy Jane Jones (nee Bradley),   ...?... ,    Polly Dranfield, Edith Dranfield

 Front Row -               .....?......,   ? Collier,   .....? .......,    ......? ......

Edited by user 24 September 2010 21:20:17(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

shallcross attached the following image(s):
Goyt Mill winding dept.jpg
Shallcross
Curious  
#18 Posted : 24 September 2010 09:25:43(UTC)
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Hi Shallcross

Brilliant photo, and as you know some of my in-laws are on it.  Have you got an approximate date - we're guessing about 1910 but can you be any more accurate?

Mrs Curious

shallcross  
#19 Posted : 24 September 2010 10:28:45(UTC)
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Mrs  Curious

Maybe I should have really put  Mary ''Polly'' Depledge later Shirt as she was still a Depledge when this was taken, she was born in 1885 not sure what date this photo was taken exactly but I would say that she doesn't look 20 you started work 14 in them days so yes 1910  - 12 I would say is about correct, Elizabeth Depledge was born 1875 so that would put her at around age 35 - 37 .

I don't know if you can make out from this copy but most of them are wearing clogs

Edited by user 24 September 2010 21:18:18(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Shallcross
Curious  
#20 Posted : 24 September 2010 18:51:09(UTC)
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Hi Shallcross

Can I just check I'm looking at the same Mary 'Polly' Depledge (later Shirt) as you?  The info I've just received about the Depledges gives Mary 'Polly' Depledge as being born in 1885 not 1895 as in your last post.    I've got her sister Elizabeth Shaw (nee Depledge) born in 1875 the same as you.   

Mrs Curious

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