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Curious  
#41 Posted : 10 June 2012 11:32:59(UTC)
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Hi Aussie

You can count our family in as long lost relatives too.  I'm related by marriage to the Depledges.

Mrs C

R. Stephenson-Smythe  
#42 Posted : 10 June 2012 11:33:20(UTC)
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So then are there any of your relatives on this photo which I think is of Goyt Mill?

R. S-S

R. Stephenson-Smythe  
#43 Posted : 24 June 2012 10:04:49(UTC)
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parabuild  
#44 Posted : 02 January 2013 19:35:49(UTC)
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I have no details about this photo except to say that it was in a folder containing information about both Furness Printworks and Goyt Mill.  Can anybody help to identify it or provide any other data?

parabuild attached the following image(s):
Untitled-26.jpg
clogs  
#45 Posted : 03 January 2013 10:10:18(UTC)
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This is textile printing from copper gravure rollers probably 16” circumference if at one of the local print works. 

The tubs on the floor would contain the colour within the design carefully labled with the design number and its order of print on the machine i.e. Pitch 1 Black. And so on to perhaps Pitch 8 (or higher up to 12) Lt Green Blotch. (The large area of background colour), always last to avoid shrinkage and subsequent fit problems during print.
 
In this instance I am sure we are looking at what were known as the “Back Tentters” men who’s responsible job it was to keep a close eye on the fit and print quality.
 
We are in fact looking at the fabric on each machine in two stages unprinted and printed.
The group of men (management) will be comparing the original paper design with a “fent” torn from the machine to ensure that it is the best possible reproduction before going ahead with the bulk print.
 
The top paid job in this area apart from the manger was the Forman Printer perhaps the chap in the white jacket.
 
All this has now been replaced by Rotary Screen Printing.
 
Location could be Strines, Birch Vale, Whaley, Furness Vale or many other C.P.A print works in Lancashire,
 
 
 
 

Edited by user 03 January 2013 10:21:44(UTC)  | Reason: Spelling

shallcross  
#46 Posted : 03 January 2013 14:07:36(UTC)
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Hi David

Well one things certain it wouldn't be Goyt Mill (The Shed) as they didn't do fabric printing, that was done at the printworks later the C.P.A. (Calico Print Association) on what is now Bingswood Ind Est, one of my grandfathers was forman printer at Whaley for a number of years before finishing his working life at Courtaulds in Derby.

Shallcross
george  
#47 Posted : 03 January 2013 19:02:11(UTC)
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Yes, the photo was taken at Bingswood Print Works Whaley Bridge the man in the light jacket was probably Maurice Ramwell who was foreman printer I think. He lived at Orchard Avenue. The man between the men examining the cloth I recognise he was called Mackey I can't access my memory bank to add his first name he lived in the row of houses opposite to the Buxton Rd. entrance to the Sheps. He had a son who was Dennis Mackey who lived there until he was married who also was a printer.

I can't highlight it to copy the photo otherwise i could find out more names.   george

parabuild  
#48 Posted : 03 January 2013 21:23:52(UTC)
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Thank you very much Clogs, Shalcross and George for your responses and for the information. It's a good photograph and knowing so little about the textile industry it's interesting to find so much from a single picture. 

George, if you would like a copy of the image, I would be more than happy to email it to you or to post a print. Just send your email or postal address : furnesshistory@gmail.com

clogs  
#49 Posted : 04 January 2013 12:41:36(UTC)
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This extract from the London Gazette suggests that Bingswood Print Works had financial difficulties prior to its acquisition by the CPA.
Interesting to know when it was originally started and what the print process was at that time.

 

THE LONDON GAZETTE, JULY 20, 1900.
 

Edited by user 04 January 2013 16:22:56(UTC)  | Reason: Re- Post as image due to cut and paste text rec: problem

clogs attached the following image(s):
bing.jpg
clogs  
#50 Posted : 05 January 2013 09:16:37(UTC)
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These particular machines were almost certainly made and serviced by the Lancashire engineering company Mather & Platt.
 
A Google search produced the following.
 
 
 
 
clogs attached the following image(s):
mpl.jpg
GordonAdshead  
#51 Posted : 15 January 2015 16:23:00(UTC)
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I live in Handforth, but have just read with very great interest the discussions on Goyt Mill.   I am keen to make contact please with anyone who can help me or point me at someone who may know about the early days of this Mill.   A friend of mine sent me a copy of a page from "Cotton mills and Printworks in the River Goyt" by Stephen Lewis 2014.   This states that "The plot was bought in 1865 by Messers ADSHEAD and Brother who moved to Whaley to live in Horwich bank.   In 1869 a Mr Robert Ashworth became the manager who was very unpopular (after trying to reduce wages by 5 percent) and the mill passed to Messers Dilworth nd Son in 1870.    I carry out a one-name study of all ADSHEADs world wide, and had not come across any link with Goyt Mill up to now.   [All this happened between the 1861 and the 1871 census]  I would like to establish which ADSHEAD was involved in creating Goyt Mill.    Early ADSHEADs came from Macclesfield or Prestbury, but my own family ran cotton mills in Stalybridge, but ran into serious trouble during the time of the American Civil War (1861-1865) when no cotton reached Staybridge for 4 years.
Jack Tarr  
#52 Posted : 22 January 2015 15:58:57(UTC)
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The Depledge girls in the photo are great cousens although Polly was always known as auntie Polly
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